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Greatest selection of high end and basic yarns. Every texture, color, fiber, gauge. Come delight in the sea of color

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Exclusive Yarns & Colorways

color • saturation • hand-dyed • custom • exquisite • inspired • luscious

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Sewing

design • serge • quilt • hem • needlepoint• embroider • seam

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Exclusive Design Kits

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Webstore

exciting • curated • bespoke • yarn• artisanship • exclusive• design

 

I’m a relatively new knitter—just a few months’ shy of three years—and it was only last Summer that I discovered the joy of traveling somewhere new and checking out the local yarn stores.

It was on my yearly trip to Montreal that I realized I should be looking up stores to check out the local fare. The year before I had found a yarn store by happenstance, which happened to be holding a huge sale for the one week I was there, so I stocked up on some staples and left a happy woman. This past year, I made it a point to look up the local stores with the sole purpose of buying local, Canadian yarns that I couldn’t buy anywhere else.

This is how I discovered Handmaiden Sea Silk, which I fell in love with instantly. I quickly bought a skein and started on my very own Clapotis, a hugely popular Knitty pattern that has taken the knitting world by storm since 2004. I didn’t know then that Handmaiden had crossed the border into the States and had become readily available, but it didn’t really matter because I felt I had discovered something.

Now, when I go anywhere new, I immediately look up yarn stores to see if I can find that mysterious indie yarn that you just can’t find anywhere else. My boyfriend went to Boston a few months ago and I sent him on a similar mission – he knows nothing about yarns except that, like the Blob, they are slowly taking over his house. I told him to just go into the store, ask for the most unique, indie yarn they had, and buy it. And bless the goddesses who work in yarn stores, he was able to do just that, and came home with a yarn called Dragonfly Dyeworks which, and I am not exaggerating, I cannot even find online. It’s impossible. Google it, and you’ll probably find my Tweet about receiving it and one person’s flickr photos of a skein. Otherwise, nothing. The same thing goes for finding a skein of Wollmeise – that’s why they call it Wollmeisery (again, Google is your friend.)

Finding an Indie yarn is like discovering buried treasure. Or if you’re a New Yorker and not a pirate, finding a $20 bill on the sidewalk. It doesn’t happen often, but when it does you want to look over your shoulder to see if anyone else is as amazed as you are.

The Yarn Company is quickly becoming a New York stockpile of buried treasure – or a sidewalk bursting with orphan $20s – whichever you prefer. We have so many Indie yarns rolling in, I may never need to visit yarn stores abroad ever again (who am I kidding? I still will.)

We have the lovely Spirit Trails Fiberworks line from Virginia, which consists of one-of-a-kind, hand-dyed yarns made from rare, endangered and unusual breed; the gorgeous, always sensual Artyarns, saturated with beads and sequins and sparkling cashmere; the silky, luxurious Handmaiden, of which many of the yarns contain Seacell, a fiber made of seaweed that smells like an ocean breeze when washed (interestingly enough, Seacell is good for your body; all the healthy minerals of seawater are absorbed in seaweed, so when you wear Seacell the porous, open fiber absorbs what your skin expels, and your skin absorbs some of what is in the Seacell, despite numerous washes); Be Sweet yarns, which promotes education and adequate jobs for women in economically depressed regions of South Africa; Malabrigo yarns, hand-dyed and made from the finest merino sheep in Uruguay (and quickly becoming one of the hottest yarns in the world); Colinette Yarns, a gorgeous hand-dyed yarn from the UK that simply explodes with color; a dazzling colleciton of Knit Collage, a Great Adirondack yarns, a beautiful collection hailing from a small horse farm in upstate New York with the unique ability to produce handpainted yarns in a range of different textures (lace, ribbon, natural wool); Pagewood Farms, a hand-dyed yarn line that is innovating what yarn can be, with one-of-a-kind skeins containing felted and fiber flowers, buttons, glitter and sequins; a new linen line from local hand dyer Woodstock Knits, and Briar Rose Fibers, a family-owned business consisting of Chris Roosien and, as she puts it, “My daughter, son and daughter-in-law [as] my techies, pattern designers and wonderful support system, and my husband helps set up booth space and drives us to all of our venues.”

Many of these Indie yarns are family-run and owned, which just makes us feel like we are part of a big, fibrous family. And we couldn’t be more delighted.

So whether you’re an out-of-towner on the hunt for that one-of-a-kind skein, or you’re a die-hard New Yorker with a taste for the unexpected, The Yarn Company is now stocked to the hilt with all those special yarns you just can’t find anywhere else.

Happy Hunting!

Flossie

The Yarn Company